How to Recognize a Stroke and What to Do – BE FAST

How to Recognize a Stroke and What to Do: B-E--F-A-S-T

how to recognize stroke BEFAST

On 3-11-2017 the Cleveland Clinic published a new stroke acronym F-A-S-T-B-E. It's a modification of the old acronym F-A-S-T providers were taught previously. I have modified the order to make it easier to remember.

Here's what to look for:

B: Balance problems, sudden onset balance difficulty, or waking up with balance issues is suspect.

E: Eyes, loss of vision in one eye especially sudden painless loss or dropping of the eye lid is a red flag

F: Face, facial drooping on one side, inability to smile on one side, or cannot close an eye on one side is a sign of stroke

A: Arm weakness, inability to lift or use an arm, its as if the arm is dead means stroke

S: Speaking difficulty, often stroke victims cannot speak either inability to actually speak or slur their speech

T: Time to call 9-1-1, time is of the essence to treat a stroke, call 911 and get the person to a hospital ER ASAP. If you're in a rural area or emergency responders are far from you, put the person in your car, head to the nearest hospital and call 911 as you go and tell them what hospital you are going to.

stroke BEFAST chart

BE FAST is a great stroke acronym

Don't wait and see what symptoms do. Being fast to act may save the person's life and allow a better recovery. Nearly 2,000,000 brain cells are lost per minute when a stroke strikes! Only about 30% of patients recognize that they are having a stroke and seek immediate medical treatment. The remainder may recognize symptoms, but their brain is impaired and they cannot act on their own. Strokes aren't just in the elderly. Nearly 25% of strokes occur in people younger than 65.

Please let others know about this new stroke acronym B-E--F-A-S-T by sharing on social media. If you have elderly parents or grandparents, let them know as well.

This public health information is brought to you by:

Dr Barry Marks, Chiropractor Orange CA